Somerset attractions

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Aug09

largeThere have been many famous residents of Bath, but perhaps the most famous (and by far my favourite) is the novelist Jane Austen. While only two of her novels actually take place in Bath (Persuasion and Northanger Abbey), she spent a great deal of her life in this beautiful city.

2017 marks the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death, so in her honour, the city is in celebration of this great author and the wit and wisdom found in her novels.

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Jan25

It seems that more and more people are choosing to holiday with their four-legged friends these days.  When we opened The Old Stables we knew we would be welcoming a puppy of our own into the family so the choice to go ‘dog friendly’ wasn’t one that we debated for very long!

Jasper, our 9 month old Golden Retriever, arrived at The Old Stables in June, 2016.  Since his arrival we have welcomed no less than 20 dogs to the B&B.  All shapes, sizes and colours and all perfectly delightful (with lovely, well behaved owners too!).

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dahlboy
May18

We love books and reading.  You’ll find little book nooks all over the B&B and a plethora of genres to satisfy all ages!

2016 marks 100 years since the birth of Roald Dahl – the world’s (in my opinion) number one storyteller. Throughout 2016, there will be celebrations for Roald Dahl 100, focusing on Roald Dahl’s “gloriumptious” stories and characters and delivering a year packed with “squiggling surprises” and treats for everyone.  But did you know that prior to his writing fame, he used to sell kerosene in Shepton Mallet and the surrounding area in the 1930s?  He described the experience vividly in his autobiographical work ‘Boy: Tales of Childhood’ (published 1984):

“My kerosene motor-tanker had a tap at the back and when I rolled into Shepton Mallet or Midsomer Norton or Peasedown St John or Huish Champflower, the old girls and the young maidens would hear the roar of my motor and would come out of their cottages with jugs and buckets to buy a gallon of kerosene for their lamps and their heaters. It is fun for a young man to do that sort of thing. Nobody gets a nervous breakdown or a heart attack from selling kerosene to gentle country folk from the back of a tanker in Somerset on a fine summer’s day.” Continue reading